ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center
ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center
ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center
ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center
ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center
ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center
ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center
ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center
ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center
ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center
ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center
ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center
ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center
ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center
ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center
ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center
ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center
ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center
ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center
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ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center

ATC [Argentina Televisora Color (Argentine Color Television)] Production Center

Buenos Aires, Argentina

1978 26,840 m²

Argentina’s successful bid to host the 1978 World Cup soccer championship was contingent on its commitment to a substantial upgrading of the country’s stadia and broadcast facilities. Along with such projects as the construction of the Mendoza stadium and the renovation of the Rosario stadium, the building program called for the construction of the country’s first state-of-the-art color television production and broadcast center in time for the event’s opening ceremony. The competition for the design of the broadcast facility was opened just 18 months before the start of the games, and Viñoly’s design was selected with only 16 months to go.


The project’s extremely accelerated schedule, made necessary by the non-negotiable completion deadline, required the adoption of a radical amalgam of design and construction. In the decades that followed, this “design/build” approach would become a favorite of Viñoly’s because of the advantages of a design process continuously tempered by the realities of construction and enriched by the experience of space on the actual site. In command of a round-the-clock workforce that numbered up to 5.000 individuals, Viñoly had no alternative but to pour foundations and begin erecting the building’s steel frame with only a general notion of what the final architecture would be like. As a result, the building is the product of an evolutionary process, a state of flux between design intention and construction reality which ran uninterrupted from the goundbreaking to the opening ceremonies.


The convergence of functional requirements and the desire to integrate the building into its parkland site as harmoniously as possible yielded a design that is both a public plaza and a television production center. The principal design element, a canted plane emerging from the park, rises gradually to shelter most of the center’s facilities. On top of this tilted roof, landscaping and architectural topography – including playgrounds, a reflecting pool, an artificial stream, and an amphitheater – extend the life and activities of the adjacent park. Below the roof are production and related facilities, including six soundproof studies (adaptable for public performances as well as television production), offices, a cafeteria, lounges, and service areas. Four studios pierce the roof plane to emerge as individual volumes, on a scale in keeping with the surrounding residential neighborhood. Other discernible functional elements on the roof are a steel broadcast tower and a large tilted steel cylinder that visually isolates the facility’s satellite antenna. The tower, which supports conventional and microwave antennae, emerges from the reflecting pool that, together with the stream, acts as a natural heat exchange for the building’s extensive ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The slanting glass wall of the cafeteria, set into the sloping embankment above the reflecting pool, gives visitors to the park a glimpse of the interior life of the complex.